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European Journal of ePractice



Fuentes seleccionadas (RSS)

European Journal of ePractice

Medios Seleccionados (Pertenecen)

*European Journal of ePractice http://www.epractice.eu/en/journal/rss (10)

Fuentes de recoleccion

*


I N F O R M E



1) Fri, 05 Mar 2010 13:30:27 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25366

Government 2.0 – Hype, Hope, or Reality?

Publication Date: 
1 March 2010

Volume Number: 
9

Introduction (Homepage): 

In the space of two years, the -2.0- meme has risen from obscurity to mainstream in eGovernment policy, as the comparison between the EU Ministerial Declaration of 2007 and 2009 shows. Yet much of the debate is still on the potential opportunities and risks of Government 2.0, with evangelists emphasising the great benefits of crowdsourcing and of leveraging collective intelligence, and skeptics pointing to the risks of wishful thinking, to the limits of transparency, and to the hype about its impact. The question is then: has government 2.0 so far really provided visible benefits for citizens?

The 7 articles presented do not present conclusive evidence. Rather, they provide relevant insights for a sober assessment of the actual implications and impacts, bringing together a diverse set of points of view and with a wide geographical scope. The very definition of government 2.0 is not commonly agreed, as some articles make reference to eParticipation, which may imply any kind of participative effort using ICT, others to Open Government initiatives, which tend to be more focused on transparency and access to a particular government’s process.

The first necessary step is mapping the typology of impact. Huijboom et al., based on a large-scale study, identify the key types of impacts of web 2.0 across public services: political, socio-cultural, organisational and legal. The article clearly shows these impacts in three case studies of government 2.0, which interestingly enough are not developed within government. Whereas these cases clearly show the potential disruptive impact on those involved, they remain small groups, such as the niche of 25.000 people for the Patientslikeme.org service. Furthermore, the article reminds us that the evidence behind these impacts remains largely anecdotal.

Participation and collaboration, so far, reach a small minority of users. Ferro and Molinari frame the
debate in the context of the participation ladder theory, and remind us that European eParticipation
projects reach an average of a few hundred users: this kind of government-led 2.0 initiatives very
much share the traditional problems of low take-up of eGovernment. There is the risk of repeating
the classic mistake of eGovernment initiatives, which too often have aimed for automating rather

Author(s): 
david.osimo@cec…

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/345317
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2) Mon, 04 Jan 2010 12:53:30 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25367

eHealth and beyond

Publication Date: 
21 December 2009

Volume Number: 
8

Introduction (Homepage): 

Today, citizens aged 65+ make up close to 18 % of the total population in all EU countries and the percentage of elderly will increase further in the following years. The most dramatic raise is expected in the 80+ age range. Ageing of the population together with unhealthy life styles are generating an increased prevalence of chronic conditions that place additional strains on both health and social support systems. In this scenario, existing health systems must make the transition to new models of care, with a shift towards integrated patient management.

Today, citizens aged 65+ make up close to 18 % of the total population in all EU countries and the percentage of elderly will increase further in the following years. The most dramatic raise is expected in the 80+ age range. Ageing of the population together with unhealthy life styles are generating an increased prevalence of chronic conditions that place additional strains on both health and social support systems. In this scenario, existing health systems must make the transition to new models of care, with a shift towards integrated patient management.

Author(s): 
kolitsi
JRT

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/301991
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3) Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:47:14 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25372

Inclusive e-services

Publication Date: 
14 May 2008

Volume Number: 
3

Introduction (Homepage): 

This third issue of the European Journal of ePractice analyses attempts by local, regional and national governments and agencies to use new technologies to promote social inclusion. In its i2010 eGovernment Action Plan, the European Commission sets out a vision for the take-up and use of e-services across member states with the objectives of not only improving efficiency and saving taxpayers’ money, but also expanding democratic participation. In order to achieve these goals, it is expected that by 2010 all citizens will have access to services through a variety of channels, such as digital TV and mobile phones as well as computers. Additionally, the European Commission has recently launched a European initiative on eInclusion. Contributors to this issue reflect on what has been achieved and what still needs to be done from a variety of perspectives and contexts.

This third issue of the European Journal of ePractice analyses attempts by local, regional and national governments and agencies to use new technologies to promote social inclusion. In its i2010 eGovernment Action Plan, the European Commission sets out a vision for the take-up and use of e-services across member states with the objectives of not only improving efficiency and saving taxpayers’ money, but also expanding democratic participation.

Author(s): 
Sally

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/287880
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4) Sun, 08 Mar 2009 11:57:04 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25371

Efficiency and effectiveness

Publication Date: 
27 August 2008

Volume Number: 
4

Introduction (Homepage): 

The fourth issue of the European Journal of ePractice provides insightful and provocative reflections on the topic of -efficiency and effectiveness- of public eServices. There are analytical articles but also a couple of very telling concrete examples of how innovative deployment of ICT combined with institutional and organisational change have contributed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of public administrations.

After several years in which the policy focus for the Information Society has been simply on bringing eServices online and on benchmarking their availability and sophistication, at the end of 2003 the European Commission in its official Communication on the -Role of eGovernment for Europe’s future- stressed the need to go beyond simple availability and sophistication and to demonstrate concrete benefits and impacts. Ever since then -efficiency and effectiveness- have become one of the key pillars of the eGovernment agenda.

In 2005 the Commission financed the groundbreaking study known as eGEP, which produced a new Measurement Framework spurring debate and building up momentum. -Making efficiency and effectiveness a reality- was one of the key targets of the November 2005 eGovernment Ministerial Declaration adopted in Manchester and became later one of the objectives of the i2010 eGovernment Action Plan. The aim is to reduce by 2010 administrative burden and increase efficiency in public offices, as well as foster high transparency, accountability and user satisfaction. Currently the EC Benchlearning project is involving 12 public agencies in 9 different European countries in collaborative exercise to build measurement capacities and share experiences.

The fourth issue of the European Journal of ePractice provides insightful and provocative reflections on the topic of -efficiency and effectiveness- of public eServices. There are analytical articles but also a couple of very telling concrete examples of how innovative deployment of ICT combined with institutional and organisational change have contributed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of public administrations.

Author(s): 
ccodagnone

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/287881
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5) Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:00:33 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25370

High Impact Services

Publication Date: 
31 October 2008

Volume Number: 
5

Introduction (Homepage): 

The papers for this issue of the European Journal of ePractice were submitted at a time when there was some certainty left in the structures of governments and the services they delivered. They are being published at a time of unprecedented turmoil in business and governance. The global financial crisis of late 2008 has redefined the business/government landscape. Some banks have become bankrupt, and there is concern that even Iceland may as a country be insolvent. Many banks are now partly or fully in public ownership; many citizens who saved money to provide them with a pension on retirement may not now receive that allowance. It is not just individuals who have lost significant amounts of savings in collapsed banks; it is also some government institutions. The pressure on public finances in many countries will become extreme. It would be too simplistic to say that this is the time for eGovernment to deliver the efficiencies and societal benefits that have long been promised, but it certainly is the time to focus on delivering impact in the right areas.

The papers for this issue of the European Journal of ePractice were submitted at a time when there was some certainty left in the structures of governments and the services they delivered. They are being published at a time of unprecedented turmoil in business and governance. The global financial crisis of late 2008 has redefined the business/government landscape. Some banks have become bankrupt, and there is concern that even Iceland may as a country be insolvent.

Author(s): 
blakemore

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/287882
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6) Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:19:52 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25369

Key enablers for eTransformation? eID, Interoperability and Open Source

Publication Date: 
30 January 2009

Volume Number: 
6

Introduction (Homepage): 

The European Commission’s eGovernment Action Plan considers innovations in eIdentification, interoperability and open source software to be keys to opening the door to the transformational potential of eGovernment. The developers of eGovernment services are therefore directing additional resources on these innovations as a means for providing high impact services. But will initiatives in these areas work? Will they facilitate the efficient and correct operation of public eServices? What does the evidence suggest?

The contributions to this special issue highlight the challenges confronting efforts to create these enabling conditions. Interoperability and appropriate identification systems are major challenges in their own right. As some contributions argue, open source can help some government agencies approach these goals, but it is only one of many strategies that need to be considered.

The European Commission’s eGovernment Action Plan considers innovations in eIdentification, interoperability and open source software to be keys to opening the door to the transformational potential of eGovernment. The developers of eGovernment services are therefore directing additional resources on these innovations as a means for providing high impact services. But will initiatives in these areas work? Will they facilitate the efficient and correct operation of public eServices? What does the evidence suggest?

Author(s): 
WDutton

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/287883
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7) Sun, 08 Mar 2009 12:22:50 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25368

eParticipation

Publication Date: 
4 March 2009

Volume Number: 
7

Introduction (Homepage): 

As the European Union moves towards elections to the European Parliament in June 2009, there is a chance to reflect on the status of democracy and participation across the continent. Never before have there been such contradictory and auspicious developments in thinking about how all sections of European society can engage in policy making and political debate. On the one hand, it is clear that many have disengaged from formal politics, voter turnout is falling, membership of political parties is declining, and there is a widespread sense of a loss of trust in government and politicians. On the other hand, there is a surge of grass-root, often single issue engagement in policy making, people generally are more aware of public policy issues, and there are more outlets and channels enabling participation. Much of this is supported, and in fact driven forward, by new ICT tools. These range from the more traditional emails and electronic forums, to the Web 2.0 phenomenon of social networking, and applications which enable users to upload their own content and manipulate the content of others, as well as facilitate deliberation and debate. Indeed, many commentators have hailed President Obama as the world’s first truly Internet politician, and there is no doubt that his intelligent use of ICT in political fundraising and campaigning has opened a new chapter in eParticipation.

As the European Union moves towards elections to the European Parliament in June 2009, there is a chance to reflect on the status of democracy and participation across the continent. Never before have there been such contradictory and auspicious developments in thinking about how all sections of European society can engage in policy making and political debate. On the one hand, it is clear that many have disengaged from formal politics, voter turnout is falling, membership of political parties is declining, and there is a widespread sense of a loss of trust in government and politicians.

Author(s): 
J.Millard

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/287884
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8) Wed, 02 Mar 2011 10:30:01 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25364

E-Government for the Economic Crisis

Publication Date: 
1 March 2011

Volume Number: 
11

Introduction (Homepage): 

Many argue that these are the worst of times, and that we are very unfortunate to be living through the deepest financial crisis for seventy years. That’s one view. Others argue, as did one of US President Barack Obama’s aides a few years ago, that this crisis is too good to waste. How fortunate we are to have the chance to radically transform the ways our societies function and are governed. This other view sees the crisis as a generational opportunity for change. Venezuelan scholar, Professor Carlota Perez, in her seminal 2002 book, not only foresaw what we are now experiencing but also gave us a formula for proactive and innovative action with ICT and governance as central pillars: the need for strong policies prioritising longer-term investments in the ICT demand side (inclusion, training, take-up) coupled with government transformation based on ICT systems and new organisational models. Is the world, is Europe, living up to this challenge?

Many argue that these are the worst of times, and that we are very unfortunate to be living through the deepest financial crisis for seventy years. That’s one view. Others argue, as did one of US President Barack Obama’s aides a few years ago, that this crisis is too good to waste. How fortunate we are to have the chance to radically transform the ways our societies function and are governed. This other view sees the crisis as a generational opportunity for change.

Author(s): 
J.Millard

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/5284203
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9) Wed, 16 Mar 2011 11:16:15 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25363

The Openness of Government

Publication Date: 
17 March 2011

Volume Number: 
12

Introduction (Homepage): 

In November 1959, for TV Guide Magazine, John F. Kennedy wrote about television as -a force that has changed the political scene-. He had recently experienced the first televised Presidential debates, against Richard M. Nixon, and realised that things would never be the same again. But not even he foresaw that 50 years later, that same communication technology would still be rewriting the rules of politics and government, continuing to open up yet more aspects of political life — not least by bringing the workings of parliaments around the world into our homes.

But if you regard the phenomenon that is government, and the practice of politics within that, as social systems by which human groups (like nations, municipalities, companies, or even golf clubs) organise and regulate themselves, then it is clear that communication between people in the group is the crucial factor enabling them to work. So any technology that can change the nature and pattern of communication opens up new possibilities for the conduct of those activities.

In November 1959, for TV Guide Magazine, John F. Kennedy wrote about television as -a force that has changed the political scene-. He had recently experienced the first televised Presidential debates, against Richard M. Nixon, and realised that things would never be the same again.

Author(s): 
pwaller

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http://www.epractice.eu/en/editorial/5290077
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10) Wed, 22 Sep 2010 11:16:57 +000 Alta: 20-Jul-2011
S/D OP:25365

Implementing eAccessibility as a service quality factor

Publication Date: 
20 September 2010

Volume Number: 
10

Introduction (Homepage): 

Over the last decades Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have entered almost all aspects of our lives. The multimedial and multimodal power of ICT allows adapting systems and services to the needs of all user groups. Access has become easier due to time and location independence of ICT based services.

People with disabilities, the aging population and other groups at a disadvantage benefit most from this increased adaptability. Many ICT systems and services are assistive and inclusive for these target groups, in particular for people with disabilities, who often work with specialised Assistive Technologies (AT).

ICT and AT can be seen as universal door openers for independent participation in the information or knowledge society.

Over the last decades Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have entered almost all aspects of our lives. The multimedial and multimodal power of ICT allows adapting systems and services to the needs of all user groups. Access has become easier due to time and location independence of ICT based services.

Author(s): 
kmiesenberger

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Una respuesta a “European Journal of ePractice

  1. Anónimo 20 abril 2013 en 2:50 am

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